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TRANSMISSIONS April 2018

TRANSMISSIONS

2019 AUSTRALIAN FOLKLORE CONFERENCE

 

A reminder and confirmation that the Australian Folklore Conference will again take place at Easter, 2019. We will call for expressions of interest to present papers later in the year.

Some of the papers from this year’s conference have been posted on the AFN blog at https://ozfolknet.wordpress.com

 

DANCING THROUGH THE AGESPUBLISHED
John Gardiner-Garden has published the 33 books of his Dancing through the Ages series that he has been working on for many years. To see purchasing options (including big introductory discounts of between 15% and 33%) and the covers and contents pages of all 33 books please go to http://www.earthlydelights.com.au/books-cds and follow links.

 

John also writes: In 2019 Aylwen and I plan to tour Australasia, the U.S. and Europe joining the dots between people who have acquired the books and who would like me to teach/lead (or talk on) dances presented in the books they have (we won’t be taking books with us), so do let us know if you would like us to visit your scene and how we might contribute.

 

Dr John Gardiner-Garden

Director of the Earthly Delights Historic Dance Academy

New books at http://www.earthlydelights.com.au/books-cds

john@earthlydelights.com.au

(02) 62811098

 

HELP WANTED – BBC FOLK PROGRAMS

 

English folk historian Chris Brady is trying to locate copies of folk programs broadcast in the 60s as BBC has deleted them! He taped some of them when he was living in New Zealand & has received copies from many sources, but is still hunting & trying to disseminate his appeal. Here is Chris’s message:

BBC London Folk Song Cellar – 1960

We have discovered that in the 1960s the ABC and other radio stations aired the BBC’s ‘London Folk Song Cellar’ series. This was a mythical folk club created for the BBC World Service by EFDSS’s Peter Kennedy for invited folk guests to Cecil Sharp House for a weekly one hour folk music and song session.

There were 39 episodes. They were edited and recorded to Transcription Discs for sale to overseas radio stations including to Australia and New Zealand. We have recently purchased a number of these and are digitising them.

We also have quite a few episodes home-taped in NZ. Also some recordings from the British Forces Broadcasting Service in Kuwait and Germany.

But the only full set is in the British Library Sound Archives – which we cannot access.

And we are missing a number of episodes, not least of which is no. 28.

So we are wondering if any of your members In Australia might have home recorded tapes of these programmes. Please could you pass the word around.

Many thanks – Chris B. chrisjbrady@yahoo.com
P.S. Most of what are have are here:

http://www.mediafire.com/folder/itj99fbsepw3o/Folk_Song_Cellar_-_Final

 

THE CENTRE FOR ENGLISH TRADITIONAL HERITAGE

 

TRADITION TODAY  ISSUE 7 has now been uploaded to the CETH website:

 

www.centre-for-english-traditional-heritage.org

 

Follow any of the relevant links on the Home page to access a Table of Contents.

 

We are now actively seeking contributions for the next issue. Please go to “Guidance for Authors” at the foot of the Tradition Today contents page for information on how to format and submit contributions.

 

 

REVIEWS OF INTEREST

 

Review of George P. Knauff’s Virginia Reels and the History of American Fiddling. By Chris Goertzen. 2017. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi. ISBN: 9781496814272 (hard cover) at http://www.jfr.indiana.edu/review.php?id=2210.

 

This book is about the earliest known collection of Virginia Reels (1839) and is very relevant to the history of fiddling in Australia, especially regarding the potential for discovery of ‘lost’ manuscripts and tune transcriptions.

 

 

MARK GREGORY’S TREASURE TROVE

 

As always, Mark continues to trawl the marvellous Trove for treasures of Australian folksong, verse and much more. Go here: http://folkstream.com/reviews/

 

 

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TRANSMISSIONS

April 2018

Occasional Newsletter of the Australian Folklore Network

Edited by Graham Seal

https://ozfolknet.wordpress.com

and on Facebook at Australian Folklore Network

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Welcome to the post-conference edition of Transmissions. In partnership with the NLA and the NFF, the annual conference was once again well-attended and widely appreciated. For those unable to be there, a short version of the program and list of the paper abstracts appears below, as well as information on some of the papers we have posted online at https://ozfolknet.wordpress.com .

We are already receiving expressions of interest for presentations at next year’s conference and will open up the call for papers towards the end of this year.

MAILBAG (Keep ‘em coming)

FRANK THE POET

‘A Literary Curiosity’ from 1884 (and, allegedly, earlier) from Mark Gregory at http://www.folkstream.com/762.html . And lots of other goodies recently, and not-so-recently, trawled from Trove at http://folkstream.com/794.html

CHARLES THATCHER IN NEW ZEALAND

The ‘Goldfields Minstrel’s’ New Zealand songster has been digitized by the National Library of NZ at https://natlib.govt.nz/blog/posts/applause-and-tin-came-tumbling-in-the-songsters-of-charles-thatcher

Thanks to Brian Samuels.

 

PAPERS FROM THE CONFERENCE ONLINE

We have published a couple of the conference papers on the AFN blog. Tony Smith’s presentation on the jig doll in Australia is at  ozfolknet.wordpress.com/papers-from-the-national-folklore-conference/.

Graham Seal’s talk on 50 years of Australian folklore is at ozfolknet.wordpress.com/fifty-years-of-folk-and-lore-1968-2018/. The talk is open for additions and amendments if anyone wishes to make them.

If other conference presenters would like their papers published on the blog, contact g.seal@curtin.edu.au or post them directly to the blog yourself.

 

13TH NATIONAL FOLKLORE CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS

9.00 Graham Seal, Convenor – Conference welcome and opening

 

9.05 Margy Burn, Assistant Director-General, NLA

 

9.10-10.10 Presentation session 1

 

Convict Music at Port Arthur

Peter H MacFie

At Port Arthur Penal Station, Tasman Peninsula (1830-77) music, like art, was a tradeable but surreptitious commodity. While historians are aware of artist WB Gould, little is known of the musicians who traded their ephemeral skills. Convict, staff musicians and entertainers at Port Arthur included: Perez De Castanos – a Spanish guitarist transported from London; Frank ‘the Poet’ MacNamara; Neil Gow Foggo, convict seamen and fiddler from the well-known Scottish fiddling family; Piper Hugh Fraser, a bankrupt emigrant, who eloped to Hobart Town from NSW, becoming a Port Arthur overseer; and Scottish fiddler Alexander Laing, convicted in 1813 of stealing while a member of the 92nd Gordon Highlanders. His tunes were among melodies in Alexander Laing’s rediscovered 1863 MS, published recently as On the Fiddle From Scotland To Tasmania.

 

The Tale of Michael Purtill

Jeanette Mollenhauer

Michael Charles Purtill was a resident of Sydney in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and this paper traces his life and activities, based on the digitised newspapers held by the National Library of Australia. Purtill was a competitive Irish step dancer, teacher who had first lived in the United States before settling in Sydney with his wife. Purtill’s dance career reveals significant organisational, pedagogical and performative differences between step dancing as practised in his lifetime, and the nature of the genre in the twenty-first century. Purtill was also active in a variety of organisations with the purpose of fostering Irish nationalism and his manifold encounters with the judicial system illuminate both his character and the general social structures of the era. The paper demonstrates the value of historically-contextual data in choreo-musical research, and utilises the biography of one man to develop the historical narrative of Irish step dancing in an Australian context.

 

 

 

 

 

10.30-11.00 Presentation session 2

 

 

English Village Carolling in Australia and North America

Ian Russell

In the nineteenth century emigration from England to North America, Australia and New Zealand was largely driven by economic necessity and occupational opportunities. Many male migrants took their skills and expertise to the ‘new’ country, living a solitary existence divorced from family, friends and the landscape of home, with their dream of new-found wealth dashed by the hard life and strange country they found. However, others strived and built ‘a home from home’, encouraging and arranging for members of their family to join them. They upheld their beliefs and cultural traditions, some of which took hold and flourished in their new environment. The celebration of Christmas provided a particularly powerful focus of continuity with their past and in some communities this centred around the tradition of singing Christmas carols, both within places of worship and outside, as part of annual perambulations. In this paper I discuss the case of three remarkable communities where the carolling has continued to be practised and has achieved its own local identity – Glen Rock in Pennsylvania, Grass Valley in California in the USA, and Moonta in the Yorke Peninsula of South Australia.

 

11.15-12.15 Fifty Years of Folk and Lore (Public lecture in Theatre)

Graham Seal

The National Library of Australia building opened in 1968. At the fiftieth anniversary, we look at the progress of Australian folklore studies, collection, research, archiving and dissemination through performance, publication and digitisation.

12.15-12.45 Lunch

12.45-1.45 concert (Theatre)

THE DARWIN RONDALLA STRINGBAND

The vibrant music of old Darwin includes traditional Filipino melodies, Top End dance tunes and medleys of the Beatles and Santana. Produced and presented by Rob Willis.
2.00-3.15 Presentation session 3

 

 

Brad Tate: Australian Folk Verse and Melody

David Johnson with Kerry Tate

Brad Tate was a well-known Australian folklorist, performer and collector. Prior to his recent death he was working on a book titled Australian Folk Verse and Melody, in which he drew on his extensive knowledge and library to explore the background to Australian folk songs and the tunes that were used for them. It was hoped that Brad could have been at the conference to launch his book but as his health made travel unlikely his wife Kerry arranged to video record him introducing himself and his work. This session will launch the book (of some 300 pages) and present the video of Brad talking through an introduction to it. Dave, Kerry and some fellow musicians will prove Brad’s work lives on by playing some of the tunes from his earlier publication, Down and Outback. Finally, folklorist Mark Gregory will offer a few words about Brad’s contributions and call for brief recollections from the floor.

Copies of the book will be available for purchase.

 

Successful Folklore Practice?

June Factor and Gwenda Beed Davey

Together and separately, since the 1970s Gwenda Davey and June Factor have researched, published, educated and organised in the previously largely neglected field of children’s folklore, with a particular focus on its history, culture and development in Australia. Has this extensive output influenced the major cultural and educational institutions in this country, or the broader popular culture?

 

Rather than the usual question and answer sequence after a paper, Gwenda and June would like their presentation to open a discussion from conference participants, building on their own experience.

 

3.30-4.30 Presentation Session 4

From Parents to Players – Anatomy of a Tropical Bush Band

Jeff Corfield

What do you do when you want to run a bush dance to raise funds for your local school – and you can’t find a local bush band? You teach yourselves to play some instruments and form your own bush band of course. And what do you do when you want the local school kids to learn to play Australian bush tunes and songs – and the school has no music teacher? Easy, you teach them yourselves! This was the genesis of Townsville’s Wattle n Gum Bush Band, way back in 1983. Almost 35 years on Wattle n Gum are still playing for local bush dances and community functions, bringing Australian bush tunes and songs to new generations of enthusiasts in tropical Townsville and surrounds. In the lead-up to Wattle n Gum’s 35th birthday, this paper tells the story of a community based bush band that has become a musical icon.

 

The Jig Doll in Australian Folklore: Untapped Potential

Tony Smith

The jig doll is a type of puppet. It is usually a rod puppet. It can be made to dance to music for its movement value and/or as a percussion instrument. They are usually jointed dolls.

The jig doll (limberjack, limberjill, clogging doll in North America) has a history as a folk toy. It is related to the marionette de la planchette which makes use of strings through the doll’s body.

Jig dolls are operated from above by rod or sprung wire and/or below by a board. The operation can be two-handed, one-handed or hands free. The operation can be mechanised in various ways using wind power, steam or sand. Instead of manual operation they can be arranged on a pedal machine which is convenient for instrumentalists.

Jig dolls have the potential to fit into folk life in many ways including the art and craft involved in the working of wood and painting and dressing of the puppet. They are useful for busking and as percussion instruments to accompany sessions. They can evoke images of dances, sometimes very acrobatically. They have great potential to be used in occupational therapy.

4.30pm Conference concludes

 

Thanks to all who organised presented and attended, to the NLA and NFF and to session chairs Jenny Gall and Keith McKenry. Thanks also to the Conference Organising Committee:

Graham Seal – (Convener)

Gwenda Davey

Jennifer Gall

Kevin Bradley

Rob Willis

Graham McDonald

 

SUBMISSIONS TO TRANSMISSIONS

We’re always on the lookout for interesting links, nuggets of information about relevant publications, recordings etc. Email to g.seal@curtin.eu.au

 

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14th National Folklore Conference 2019 Program

 

An annual conference facilitated by the Australian Folklore Network, the National Library of Australia, the National Folk Festival and Curtin University.

National Library of Australia – April 18

Building on previous National Folklore Conferences since 2006, the Australian Folklore Network, the National Library of Australia and the National Folk Festival again host this one-day conference immediately before the National Folk Festival.

The conference brings together those involved in collecting, researching, archiving, performing and facilitating folklore in all its many varieties and is a prelude to the National Folk Festival, which also includes a stream of presentations and performances relevant to folklore research.

The organising partners for this event are all involved in one or more aspects of folklore collection, research, archiving and teaching:

• the National Library of Australia is the premier archive of folklore, as well as initiating and supporting extensive fieldwork programs and fellowships
• the National Folk Festival is the premier venue for the presentation and performance of Australian folk traditions
• the Australian Folklore Network connects the various folkloric interests and activities around the nation through its e-publication, Transmissions and through projects, presentations and publications
• the Australian Folklore Research Unit at Curtin University is involved in collecting, archiving, researching and teaching folklore – regionally, nationally and internationally

The conference brings these interests together, providing an opportunity for participants to discuss at a national level, issues and initiatives in the collection, study and dissemination of Australian folklore.

The conference also contains a number of related events and awareness opportunities, including a lunchtime concert as well as details of new publications, recordings and initiatives.
Conference Program

9.15 Graham Seal and NLA – Conference welcome and opening
9.30-10.30 Presentation session 1
Graham McDonald
The Death of Frank Gardiner
The notorious bushranger Frank Gardiner was exiled from Australia in 1876, a third of the way through a lengthy jail sentence. He ended up in San Francisco, California where he ran two saloons for a few years before disappearing. His ultimate fate remains a mystery, but this paper will explore the many theories and the folklore surrounding the death of Frank Gardiner.
Graham McDonald has been mucking around with folklore for well over 40 years, as an occasional performer, broadcaster, writer and arts administrator. Stories about Australian bushrangers have been of longstanding interest.

Mark Gregory
The Cyprus Brig and other folkloric finds

In 1953, the folk revival was catalysed by a New Theatre performance of Dick Diamond’s musical with a union theme – Reedy River. The play the play highlighted the interconnectedness of the folk revival, theatre and union culture and militancy. From this key event that both the folk song revival and a renewed interest in the writing and performing of union songs can be traced.
My interest and active involvement in the revival led me in 1994 to launch two websites, ‘Australian Folk Songs’ with 100 songs and ‘Union Songs‘. which became a distribution site for the 32 songs and poems I collected during the Patrick Dispute. ‘Union Songs’ now holds more than 843 songs and poems. Over the last ten year, through the National Library of Australia’s TROVE newspaper digitisation project, I have been able to add over a thousand new items to the Australian Folk Songs collection.
Mark Gregory inherited a fascination for rebellious song and poetry from his family. Whether it was his mother singing ‘Hallelujah, I’m a Bum’ or his father reciting ‘A Man’s a Man For a’ That’ or hearing Paul Robeson on a windup gramophone with ‘Joe Hill’ it entered his childhood repertory. As time and circumstance allowed, these experiences led to years of research into this extraordinary genre and the broader field of Australian folk song.
11-12.00 Presentation session 2

Yvette Staelens
Cornwall to Kadina with Twenty-Six Cornish Carols
Joseph Glasson was born in the Cornish village of Lelant in 1855 and he died in South Australia aged 83. He was one of the Cornish emigrants who settled in ‘Australia’s Little Cornwall’, one of the so-called ‘Cousin Jacks and Jennys’ who created communities of families with Cornish origins in mining districts on South Australia’s northern Yorke Peninsula. With him he brought his heritage and a specific music tradition, the Cornish folk carol. This paper will explore Joseph’s music making at home in Cornwall and in South Australia, seeking to understand the social dimensions of his music-making; context, community and intriguingly how a miner made it to the concert hall directing an award- winning choir.
Yvette Staelens is a Senior Teaching Fellow at Bournemouth University, Dorset, UK. She was awarded an AHRC Knowledge Transfer Fellowship for the ‘The Singing Landscape Project’and her research output includes the production of Folk Maps for the counties of Somerset, Gloucestershire and Hampshire, freely available online. She is currently co-ordinating the pioneering Human Henge project exploring the impact of prehistoric heritage on mental well-being. Yvette is a natural voice practitioner and currently musical director of three choirs in Somerset. She was also a founder member of the John Moore Quire and retains a research interest in West Gallery Music.
Kerith Power

The First Australian Women’s Songbook

In 1988, following my co-ordination of a series of National Women’s Music Festivals, I was funded by the Australia Council to compile the First Australian Women’s Songbook. I sent out a national call and throughout 1990 worked to compile 50 songs sent to me on cassette tapes from all over Australia, representing songwriters from a range of backgrounds and themes relevant to women. By 1991 I had completed a draft consisting of sheet music with short biographies and photographs of each songwriter. Now, I am working towards making a digital archive of these songs and songwriters accessible through the website of the Jessie Street National Women’s Library. This presentation will feature a demonstration of the website entries for Phyl Lobl, Demeter Tsounis and Judy Small to illustrate the continuing relevance of grassroots women’s music to Australian community life in the twenty-first century.
Kerith Power has been a songwriter-singer and guitar player since 1963, and has played at Woodford, the National Folk Festival and Port Fairy as a member of the traditional dance bands Nightcap String Band and Heroines Riding Bareback. In 1982 with feminist colleagues she organised a women’s concert in Lismore featuring Margret Roadknight and initiated the First National Women’s Music Festival in Lismore in 1985. She secured Australia Council funding and was involved in organising the three festivals that followed on a biennial basis, staffed by women volunteers and featuring a range of performers.

12-1.30 Lunch and Concert
Theresa (Teri) Young is this year’s featured guest of the National Library of Australia. Teri is a young singer/composer who makes simple and sincere Australian folk music – songs about people, communities, death, love and all things honest. She plays a cittern guitar and sings, telling the stories of people and places. Teri was the winner of the 2018 National Festival Alistair Hulett award for Songs of Social Justice. Join Teri accompanied by Hamish Stevenson and Ross Smithard, in conversation and concert with NLA folklorist, Rob Willis.
12.00 in the Theatre
1.30 -3.00 Presentation session 3
Heather Clarke
Rediscovering a lost convict culture
Some of the reasons we study history are to find new perspectives, and to recover lost knowledge. The culture of early Australian convicts is a field where little research has been undertaken. This gap in knowledge arose from people wanting to forget the “convict stain” with the perception of convicts leading vile and degraded lives. However, convicts were transported with their robust enthusiasm for music and dance unbroken. The records of their closely monitored lives, though never intended for this purpose, provide a vast amount of information about their pastimes. By studying official documents in Britain, in-transit, and in the colony, it is possible to uncover this culture and to capture a glimpse of a very different convict identity. Doctoral research at the Queensland University of Technology has revealed a substantial body of data about the tunes and dances which convicts shared. This is a significant contribution to our understanding of Australian heritage, covering both cultural and labour history. Given that an estimated 1/3 of the population have a convict ancestor, it provides a fresh insight into the ways our forebears coped with their new lives in a strange land.
Dr Heather Clarke is a 3rd generation folkie, involved in folk music and dance all her life, she specialises in Australian step dance and early colonial culture. Her ambition is to enrich and expand the bush tradition by highlighting aspects which have been under-represented. In 2018 Heather completed a doctoral research project into convict culture.

Emma Nixon
Scottish Ceilidhs in Brisbane: ritual and identity through dance and music
Scottish ceilidhs are a community-based form of celebration centred around traditional music and dance. Ceilidhs are currently popular in Australia to celebrate weddings, birthdays and significant Scottish dates. Further, community ceilidhs being run in Brisbane are attracting an increasing number of participants, who come for many different reasons. Some come to engage in their own heritage, others enjoy the participatory nature of the entertainment and/ or the opportunity to include family members of different generations in a joint, physical and fun activity. This presentation explores why people choose to book a live ceilidh band and dance caller to mark significant occasions and incorporates the findings of a survey of ceilidh- goers and discusses the motivations of attendees of community events and those who have chosen to engage artists for private ceilidhs.
Emma Nixon is an award-winning teacher and performer, who combines the classical and traditional disciplines with a particular emphasis on the Scottish fiddle tradition in Australia. Emma is also a highly regarded researcher, currently undertaking study towards a PhD, having completed been completed a Master of Music in Folk and Traditional Music at Newcastle University (UK). Emma performs around Australia and internationally with both Cloudstreet and The Black Bear Duo and is the founder and musical director of the Queensland Youth Folk Orchestra.

Dave de Hugard
The Forgotten Mudgee Waltz
John Meredith recorded in the 1950s a number of versions of a waltz that came to be known as ‘The Mudgee Waltz’. Significant among these recordings are the versions played by George Davis, Tom Blackman (Jun.), Vince Holland and Vince’s father, Fred Holland. Tom Blackman (Jun.) told Meredith he learned the tune from his father Tom Blackman (Sen.). Now transcriptions of the Davis, Blackman and Vince Holland versions appear in the classic, ‘Folk Songs of Australia’ 1968. But totally absent in this publication and significantly so, in my view, is the version that Fred Holland himself played. ‘Significantly’ because Meredith tells us Fred Holland told him he taught the tune to Tom Blackman (Sen.). And since Fred Holland’s version is interestingly different from the other versions mentioned above, it is this missing Fred Holland tune that I am calling here, ‘The Forgotten Mudgee Waltz’.

As a folklorist, collector and a performer and interpreter of traditional Australian songs and tunes, Dave de Hugard has had a long interest in folk creativity. He has also had a continuing interest in the seeking out of possible origins of traditional tunes. For Dave, though, it is not where a tune might originally have come from that is important, but what traditional musicians have done with it. Dave will take a look at some of the tunes that, collectively, we know these days as ‘The Mudgee Waltz’. Some of these variant tunes we will know, while some we may not.

3.30-4.30 Presentation Session 4

Graham Seal (Chair), Jenny Gall, Rob Willis, Gwenda Davey
Panel and discussion session – Where to next for Australian Folklore?

4.30 Conference concludes

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AUSTRALIAN FOLKLORE NETWORK

The Australian Folklore Network (AFN) is a national coalition of individuals and organisations with an interest in one or more aspects of folklore collection, archiving, research, teaching, administration and performing. In partnership with the National Library of Australia, the National Folk Festival and Curtin University, the AFN hosts an annual conference, publishes the occasional Transmissions, coordinates the Register of Australian Folklore Collections, carries out and fosters projects and generally promotes Australian folklore in all its varieties nationally and internationally.

Individuals and organisations with an involvement or interest in these activities are invited to add their email address to our list. It is also possible for organisations and individuals to affiliate with the AFN at no-charge and obligation-free. Affiliates appear on the Affiliates list at the AFN blog

To join the AFN email list contact g.seal@curtin.edu.au

To affiliate with the AFN go to ozfolknet.wordpress.com

Follow the AFN on Facebook.
(The AFN is coordinated and resourced through the Australian Folklore Research Unit at Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia)

14thNational Folklore Conference 2019

REGISTRATIONS OPEN

 

An annual conference facilitated by the Australian Folklore Network, the National Library of Australia, the National Folk Festival and the Australian Folklore Unit, Curtin University.

 

National Library of Australia – April 18

 

 

Building on previous National Folklore Conferences since 2006, the Australian Folklore Network, the National Library of Australia and the National Folk Festival again host this one-day conference immediately before the National Folk Festival.

 

The conference is of interest to anyone involved in collecting, researching, archiving, performing, teaching and facilitating folklore in all its many varieties. It is a prelude to the National Folk Festival, which also includes a stream of presentations and performances relevant to folklore research.

 

Registrations are now open. Attendance at the conference is free but attendees must register at:

 

cknow@iinet.net.au

 

Preliminary program (subject to change without notice)

 

Yvette Staelens

Cornwall to Kadina with Twenty-Six Cornish Carols

 

Dave de Hugard

The Forgotten Mudgee Waltz

 

Mark Gregory

The Cyprus Brig and other folkloric finds

 

Graham McDonald

The Death of Frank Gardiner

 

Kerith Power

The First Australian Women’s Songbook

 

Heather Clarke

Rediscovering a lost convict culture

 

Emma Nixon

Scottish Ceilidhs in Brisbane

 

 

As usual, there will also be a lunchtime concert included in the program, this year:

 

Theresa (Teri) Young is this year’s featured guest. Teri is a young singer/composer who makes simple and sincere Australiana folk music – songs about people, communities, death, love and all things honest. She plays a cittern guitar and sings, telling the stories of people and places. Teri was the winner of the 2018 National Festival Alistair Hulett award for Songs of Social Justice.  Teri and her accompanist, Hamish Stevenson, will be in conversation and concert with NLA folklorist, Rob Willis.

 

14th National Folklore Conference 2019

REGISTRATIONS OPEN

An annual conference facilitated by the Australian Folklore Network, the National Library of Australia, the National Folk Festival and the Australian Folklore Unit, Curtin University.

National Library of Australia – April 18

Building on previous National Folklore Conferences since 2006, the Australian Folklore Network, the National Library of Australia and the National Folk Festival again host this one-day conference immediately before the National Folk Festival.

The conference is of interest to anyone involved in collecting, researching, archiving, performing, teaching and facilitating folklore in all its many varieties. It is a prelude to the National Folk Festival, which also includes a stream of presentations and performances relevant to folklore research.

Registrations are now open. Attendance at the conference is free but attendees must register at:

cknow@iinet.net.au

Preliminary program (subject to change without notice)

Yvette Staelens

Cornwall to Kadina with Twenty-Six Cornish Carols

Dave de Hugard

The Forgotten Mudgee Waltz

Mark Gregory

The Cyprus Brig and other folkloric finds

Graham McDonald

The Death of Frank Gardiner

Kerith Power

The First Australian Women’s Songbook

Heather Clarke

Rediscovering a lost convict culture

Emma Nixon

Scottish Ceilidhs in Brisbane

As usual, there will also be a lunchtime concert included in the program, this year:

Theresa (Teri) Young is this year’s featured guest. Teri is a young singer/composer who makes simple and sincere Australiana folk music – songs about people, communities, death, love and all things honest. She plays a cittern guitar and sings, telling the stories of people and places. Teri was the winner of the 2018 National Festival Alistair Hulett award for Songs of Social Justice.  Teri and her accompanist, Hamish Stevenson, will be in conversation and concert with NLA folklorist, Rob Willis.

 

Tradition Today 6 now out

The Centre for English Traditional Heritage is pleased to announce:

Tradition Today issue 6 has now been uploaded to the CETH website:

www.centre-for-english-traditional-heritage.org

Follow any of the relevant links on the Home page to access a Table of Contents.

We are now actively looking for contributions for the next issue. Please go to “Stylesheet: How to format submissions to this e-journal” at the foot of the Tradition Today contents page for information on how to format and submit contributions.

With best wishes,

The Editors

New book on 19C Songsters

My latest book, Cheap Print and Popular Song in the Nineteenth Century: A Cultural History of the Songster (edited with Derek B. Scott and Patrick Spedding) is published today by Cambridge University Press.

The book is a study of songsters – pocket-sized anthologies of songs, usually without notation – and the musical, social, intellectual and economic functions they served.

The cover pic (see attached) is a depiction of a performance by the singer-songwriter and political activist, Charles Thatcher, in the Napier Hotel, Ballarat, c. 1854.

 

DR PAUL WATT

Senior Lecturer, Musicology

Co-ordinator, Ethnomusicology and Musicology

Co-ordinator, Research

Editor | Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle

Sir Zelman Cowen School of Music

Level 2, Room 212, Building 68, Clayton Campus

Monash University VIC 3800

Australia

T: +613 9905 3634

E: paul.watt@monash.edu

W: http://profiles.arts.monash.edu.au/paul-watt/

Danny Spooner and Hugh Anderson

 

Singer, social historian and all-round great bloke Danny Spooner died on Friday March 3. He was a leading light of the Australian folk revival from the beginning. His singing, humour and generosity were known to audiences around the country and around the world. A large tribute concert was held in Daylesford on February 11 and Danny sang at the Cobargo festival last weekend.

Hugh Anderson, folklorist, historian and literary critic has passed away in Melbourne, also on Friday March 3. Hugh was likewise an early participant in the folk movement and made important and enduring contributions through his many books and articles. A celebration of his life will be held at University House Melbourne on March 23, 5-7 pm. Anyone wishing to attend should email warwick.anderson@sydney.edu.au

Danny and Hugh were good friends. Extended tributes and memorials to the lives and achievements of both men will no doubt be coming in due course. For now, on behalf of the Australian Folklore Network, our sympathies to their families and many friends.

Graham Seal

Convenor

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